Thomas Bennett, 1588

Name
Thomas /Bennett/
Given names
Thomas
Surname
Bennett
Thomas Bennett + … …
himself
son
son
son
son
son
son
Birth
Emigration
Type: 1588 Thomas (snr) emigrated to Ireland with Phane Beecher 26/9/1612 Charter of Baltimore.
1588 (aged 0)

1588 Thomas (snr) emigrated to Ireland with Phane Beecher
26/9/1612 Charter of Baltimore. Thomas Bennett the elder and Thomas Bennett the younger were named among the first twelve burgesses of
Baltimore. R. Caulfield, The Council Book of Kinsale 1879
Fiants of Queen Elizabeth, p 35. No. 5266
Grant to Phane Beecher of London, gent; of the castle of O Mahowny, alias O Mahown’s castle,and a moiety of the country and cantred of Kinalmechi,
alias Kilnalmechi which lies on both sides of the river of Bandon and adjoins the country of Carbry on the south and Muskery on the north, in co. Cork;
and to Hugh Worth of Somerton, Somersetshire, gent; of the other moiety of Kinalmechi, the country containing in all 28,000 acres. To hold for ever in
fee farm and common socage. Rent from each from 1594, £66.13s.4d (half only for the preceding three years) and ½d. for each acre of waste land
brought into tillage. If the lands are found by measurement within 10 years to contain more than the estimated number of acres, they shall pay one
penny farthing and the third of a farthing for each English acre so in excess. Each of the grantees is subject to the conditions imposed on all the
undertakers in Munster. 30 Sept; 1588
[Phane Beecher was the second son of Alderman Henry Beecher of London.]

Death of a son
before 1636 (aged 48 years)
Death of a son
1636 (aged 48 years)
Death of a son
about 1636 (aged 48 years)
Death of a son
1673 (aged 85 years)
Death
yes
Emigration
Shared note

1588 Thomas (snr) emigrated to Ireland with Phane Beecher
26/9/1612 Charter of Baltimore. Thomas Bennett the elder and Thomas Bennett the younger were named among the first twelve burgesses of
Baltimore. R. Caulfield, The Council Book of Kinsale 1879
Fiants of Queen Elizabeth, p 35. No. 5266
Grant to Phane Beecher of London, gent; of the castle of O Mahowny, alias O Mahown’s castle,and a moiety of the country and cantred of Kinalmechi,
alias Kilnalmechi which lies on both sides of the river of Bandon and adjoins the country of Carbry on the south and Muskery on the north, in co. Cork;
and to Hugh Worth of Somerton, Somersetshire, gent; of the other moiety of Kinalmechi, the country containing in all 28,000 acres. To hold for ever in
fee farm and common socage. Rent from each from 1594, £66.13s.4d (half only for the preceding three years) and ½d. for each acre of waste land
brought into tillage. If the lands are found by measurement within 10 years to contain more than the estimated number of acres, they shall pay one
penny farthing and the third of a farthing for each English acre so in excess. Each of the grantees is subject to the conditions imposed on all the
undertakers in Munster. 30 Sept; 1588
[Phane Beecher was the second son of Alderman Henry Beecher of London.]

Note

From: The History of Bandon - George Bennett
"Amongst those in this county who broke off all connection with the Royal cause, were:- Sir Hardress Waller, commander of Cork city; Captain Muschamp, commander of the Cork garrison; Thomas Bennett, governor of Baltimore Castle; Robert Salmon, of Castlehaven Castle; and Captain Robert Gookin."

Note

From: The History of Bandon - George Bennett.
Bennett, Captain Thomas (governor of Baltimore Castle, ancestor of the Bennett’s of Bandon and of Bennett’s Grove, Clonakilty). was second son of Thomas Bennett, of Bandon; which Thomas is believed to have been the eldest son of a younger brother of Thomas Bennett, of Clapcot, the father of Thomas Bennett, who was high-sheriff of London in 1594, and lord mayor upon the accession of James the First (1603), upon which accession he was created a baronet. During the latter part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, the colony of Bandon-bridge was established by Phane, son of Alderman Henry Beecher, of London. Beecher was accompanied to his “new plantation” by the sons of some of the members of the London corporation, as well as the younger sons of families from various parts of England. These together founded the original colony; and amongst them was Thomas Bennett. He died prior to 1632, and three of his sons - Jonathan, Thomas, and George - were appointed “executors of their father dying intestate”. His second son, the governor of Baltimore, was, as we have said, Thomas Bennett. He was an active member of the Bandon corporation, of which he was elected a burgess, June 12th, 1632, in room of Stephen Skipwith, one of the first twelve elected. In 1637, having removed to Baltimore, he resigned his burgesship, to the regret of the corporation, as follows - “Whereas Thomas Bennett, one of the free-burgesses of this borough, has removed himself out of said corporation; and it is now declared in forth and so forth that, in respect of his residence, he cannot be any way of assistance to the provost and free-burgesses of this corporation, and he having desired that he might be deprived of the said office of free-burgess of this borough, we regret his having so desired as aforesaid.” - (Vide Corporation Records.) The year before (1636) he obtained from Walter Coppinger the castle, town, and lands of Baltimore, and part of the lands of Tullough, as appears by an indenture bearing date June 30th, 1636, in which “Walterius Coppinger,” demised to him “castr vill’ er terr’ de Downeshed als Baltimore, an messuag’ et tribus carrucat’ terr’ de Tullough in com’ pred’, “ &c. Governor Bennett, was strongly attached to the Parliament, and took an early opportunity of declaring in its favour. “Baltimore Castle, well-mounted with ordnance, was in the hands and under the command of Thomas Bennett, a Parliamentarian.” - (Vide Carte MSS., Oxford.) Notwithstanding his avowed hostility to the Royalist party after they became united with the Irish, yet his services in the cause of England (478) were too prominent a character to be passed over unrequited; accordingly his name was inserted in the savings under the Act of Settlement for the full amount of his claims, (i.e. £1,099 13s. 6d.) He is also mentioned in the list of 1649 officers. He died, leaving with other male issue, Thomas, his successor, and a daughter Frances, who married Sir Richard Hull, a justice of the Court of Common Pleas (temp. Charles the Second); by whom she had a son William, who inherited the manor of Lemcon and other considerable possessions, and a daughter, who married her cousin Moore of the family of Sir E. Moore, baronet of Rosscarbery. Thomas, his successor, married a Miss Wood, of Baltimore, by whom he had two sons:- Thomas, who inherited the family estates, and resided at Ringrove (alias Bennett’s Grove), Clonakilty; and William, who settled in Bandon where he married (December 27th, 1715,) Dorothy Whelply, by whom he had, with other issue - Thomas, who married Mary, daughter of Captain Smith, and sister of the Rev. William Elliott Mars Smith, of Easingwold, Yorkshire, and died in 1808, leaving numerous issue.